Analyst: TV downloads ‘use underhand tactics’

30 07 2007

So says Jupiter Media broadband analyst Mike Fogg, quoted in The Guardian today.

Mr Fogg warns that new U.K. download services such as BBC iPlayer, 4oD and Sky Anytime use [the same Kontiki] software which continues to upload downloaded file fragments in the background, even though the requested piece of content may already have finished downloading. “Many will notice that their internet connections may be running slower, but will not necessarily know why,” the sage of Jupiter adds.

Welcome to the wonderful world of peer-to-peer, Mr Fogg, it’s the way the technology works. You get something and act as partial onward distributor for others who may want the same thing. Slower connection speeds could as attributable to ISPs throttling speeds for heavier users, as it is to the Kontiki app. itself.

The analyst may have a point though when it comes to transparency from the content providers themselves: information on how to turn the Kontiki app. off, however, would be counter-productive as it reduces the available pool of onward distributors.

But then again, as he also observes: “Other peer-to-peer programs such as Skype and Joost [coincidentally from the same people] – which do not behave in this way – have come from people who understand how the internet works… These guys [BBC, Channel 4, Sky] are broadcasters and don’t necessarily have the same understanding.”

In a not entirely unrelated development, New Media Markets [sorry, subscription only] last week reported that the U.K.’s Virgin Media is to cap connection speeds for heavier users at time of peak demand (4pm-12 midnight) across its entire network, following successful trials earlier this year. A user on a 20 Mbit/sec contract exceeding a 3GB download threshold, for example, would typically have the tap turned down by 5 Mbit / sec. The restriction remains in place for four hours.

Nothing particularly novel about turning the tap up and down, it’s common practice by U.K. ISPs to help manage capacity. What is new is the end of Virgin Media’s truly ‘unlimited’ broadband offer, a U.S.P in the U.K. consumer broadband sector (at least for the price). On balance, p2p traffic figures do bear out that Virgin has a disproportionate number of heavier users vs. other U.K. ISPs. But speaking of transparency, how are Virgin proposing to announce this to customers?

Advertisements